A short explanation of Super Tuesday

A short explanation of Super Tuesday

March 01
12:16 2016

Alexandria Reeves | Staff Writer

@alliereeves23

Texas and nearly a dozen other states will be participating in Super Tuesday to nominate a candidate for the general election in November.

Texas is one of a handful of states with open primaries, which means you don’t have to pledge loyalty to a party in order to vote in the election. Typically, you’d have to register as a Democrat to vote as such in the primary and same for Republicans.

If you are eligible and registered, you can go to your local polling place to vote. The state’s Republican and Democratic delegates will then go on to select a candidate based on the results. This tends to discourage a lot of people, as this is when the familiar echo of “my vote doesn’t actually count” begins.

On the Democratic side, most of these delegates are “pledged delegates,” meaning they are awarded to the candidate in proportion to the amount of votes received from the ballot, as long as they receive at least 15 percent of the vote. So, if UNT were its own district and 70 percent of the student body voted for Hillary Clinton, 70 percent of the Democratic delegates in UNT’s district would be obligated to support Clinton during the nomination process.

On the Republican side, there are three delegates for each of Texas’ 36 districts, making a total of 108 delegates that will be “district level delegates”. The Republican delegates are also handed out proportionately to ballot results, but things are a bit more complex. A candidate must win at least 20 percent of the primary vote in a district in order to receive any delegates. After that, there are three ways for a candidate to receive delegates:

  1. If a single candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote, they receive all three delegates.
  2. If no candidate reaches 50 percent, the delegate with at least 20 percent receives two delegates and the runner-up receives one.
  3. If no candidate reaches 20 percent, the top three will receive one delegate each.

For more election coverage and results, stay tuned to North Texas Daily.

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