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‘Coco’ honors day of the dead

‘Coco’ honors day of the dead

‘Coco’ honors day of the dead
October 31
10:30 2018

Day of the Dead (or Dia de los Muertos) is here, and with the holiday, one can’t help but remember “Coco.” Not only was it a success, but the Pixar movie also honored a holiday that is rarely talked about.

The movie was released in Spanish as well, and it included a new set of voice actors, for the most part, and a depth that reaches Spanish speakers.

A joke included in both the English and Spanish version alluded to a dirty joke, but if you didn’t know Spanish, or that particular word, you wouldn’t have caught on. It makes sense in both languages, but more so in Spanish because it adds context. Hector is the object of the joke, which surrounds his death. The joke is he choked on a chorizo. (I’ll leave some of you to Google it.)

The music makes the Spanish version, my preferred version, because there’s more emotion and beauty behind the music. They also have a different cast, which includes Marco Antonio Solis, who’s a popular Mexican singer.

All the songs are enjoyable, but one that stands out to me is “La Llorona.” In both versions the song is sang in Spanish, but the Latin American version is the winner to me. Angelica Vela voices Mama Imelda in the Spanish version, and she has such a beautiful voice. The voices of Solis and Vale blend well, and it makes the song all the better. At the end of “La Llorona” the transition to a duet is smoother, making it a more enjoyable listening experience outside of watching the movie.

One of the few voice actors that stays the same in both versions is Hector, who is played by Gael Garcia Bernal. He is a Mexican actor who also starred in “Mozart in the Jungle,” an Amazon exclusive show that has garnered critical acclaim. One of the songs I find different in Spanish by Hector is “Juanita.”

Another difference to note are the ending credits in which it says “The End.” In the English version you see a banner saying “The End,” and in the Spanish it just says “Coco,” which I think captures the story better. For Hector, it was all about seeing his daughter again. The movie itself shows us the importance of family. I don’t think it was intentional on the part of the movie producers, yet it shows how the two movies have a different impact.

“Coco” shows us the importance of family and in turn honors Day of the Dead (or Dia de los Muertos), which is all about honoring your ancestors. Just as we see the flower petals throughout the whole movie, we can remember “Coco” once again for what it does to honor Mexican culture.

Featured Image: Courtesy Facebook

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Raquel Villatoro

Raquel Villatoro

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