Coyote Music Studio helps through harmony

Coyote Music Studio helps through harmony

Coyote Music Studio helps through harmony
April 12
11:18 2018

When you walk into Coyote Music Studio, you might be slightly confused.

Owner Tonya Blum uses her living room to serve as the space for the studio. Xylophones, guitars, drums and other instruments take over the entire living room as soon as you walk through the doors of her cozy home and studio.

“Not renting out of a building cuts how much I would have to charge parents bringing their kids,” Blum said.

Blum is a former teacher and current music therapist who had an idea to intertwine two things she loved most: music therapy and teaching.

Music therapy isn’t teaching music or music-based at all — it’s focused on using music as a tool to accomplish individual goals.

Hope Scott sings and plays guitar. Scott instructs private and group lessons Coyote Music Studio. Will Baldwin

The Coyote Music Studio describes music therapy as “the use of music to accomplish non-musical goals. It is an ongoing, therapeutic service in which a board certified music therapist and a client (or group) develop a relationship through music in order to accomplish non-musical goals in areas such as communication, fine and gross motor skills, social/emotional stress, academics and to improve quality of life.”

Graduating from Texas Woman’s University with a graduate degree in music therapy, Blum saw the opportunity to bring music therapy to Denton.

When Blum first arrived to Denton, there was only one music therapist, Joe Pinson, who taught at TWU.

“There’s few music therapies in Denton,” Blum said. “Everybody left and taught in Dallas, but I came back. I’m trying to bring music therapy to Denton.”

Tonya Blum sings and plays ukulele. Blum is primarily a flute player however she plays and teaches a large variety of instruments. Will Baldwin

With the studio only being opened for a little more than a week, Blum is using word of mouth and local clinics to bring in customers.

Esperanza “Hope” Ada Scott serves as the studio’s private and group lessons.

“I teach percussion,” Scott said. “I’ve played in bands since 2014, starting with jam bands here in Denton.”

While many people don’t know much about music therapy or can afford it, Blum’s goal is to make it accessible to all who need it, despite whatever situation they might be in.

Blum starts with a child who has a specific special need, and each session uses music therapy to help accomplish a goal. For example, a child with obsessive-compulsive disorder could have a certain thought that triggers their thoughts, but by regularly attending therapy, Blum uses music to lessen the compulsive thoughts. Or, she uses those same compulsive thoughts to write out a song which can lessen nervousness of the thought.

Using music as a form of therapy to many is a new idea, and many options aren’t out there. Texas only has a little fewer than 250 music therapists in the state, and Denton ISD only has two. Despite this, music therapy has been found to be very successful.

Congresswoman Gabrielle Gifford, who suffered from a gunshot wound after the 2011 Tuscon shooting, credits music therapy as one of the reasons she relearned how to talk.

“I’ve had a kid who unfortunately couldn’t continue,” Blum said. “But he was able to go back to public school, which means he made progress in his therapy.”

The underscoring on music in schools once a child starts middle school is something Blum wants to change and has been trying to implement since she’s been a teacher.

“I want to have a place where people with special needs can come together,” Blum said.

Parents who have children with special needs, kids who are being home schooled and want to be around other children socially, or even kids who are having behavioral issues at school are welcome at Coyote Music Studio.

Blum’s dog Izzy is part coyote which helped inspire the name of Coyote Music Studio

Starting on April 14, Coyote Studio will be teaming up with the Juice Lab to begin hosting open mic nights for kids 17-and-under. Kids will be able to sing, play instruments, recite poetry and any other performance-based act they come up with. With summer being right around the corner, Coyote Music Studio will also host 10-week summer sessions for kids age 5 to 11 that will end with a recital. Blum will also offer a music performance class for teens and young adults over the summer.

“This is such a good thing for kids,” Scott said. “What we want to do is be a mentor to kids and create a safe space for them, there are times where they might open up to us about stuff they don’t open up to their parents about.”

Coyote Music Studio is more than just a music studio where you can learn how to play an instrument. Kids, teens and adults can build relationships with each other to help achieve goals while using music as an outlet.

“Tonya’s vision for Coyote Music Studio was an inspiration to help others learn and grow in music,” Blum’s boyfriend Randy Lincoln said. “We like to be an example that music is not only something you do, but that it is a way of life.”

Featured Image: Tonya Blum plays guitar while Hope Scott accompanies her on marimba. The marimba at Coyote Music Studio can be adjusted so children can play only in one key and never hit a wrong note. Will Baldwin

About Author

Bria Graves

Bria Graves

Related Articles

0 Comments

No Comments Yet!

There are no comments at the moment, do you want to add one?

Write a comment

Write a Comment

Sidebar Top Ad Banner

Latest Issue of North Texas Daily

Social Media

Sidebar Top Block Ad

NT Daily TV

NT Daily TV En Español

Sidebar Thumbnails Ad

Twitter Feed

North Texas Daily @ntdaily
‼️Torchy’s is finally coming to Denton‼️ https://t.co/KI4i2eP8GF
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
The center emerged out of the requests of a small group of spiritual seekers in Denton. They invited a man named Sw… https://t.co/HKP9t9Fahb
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
RT @spicer_alec: Hey #UNT22 we’re here at the orientation fair! Stop by, say hi and pick up a copy of our newest edition📰 https://t.co/KtCq
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
Opinion: “There is a difference between mindlessly playing something to occupy time and learning techniques that ca… https://t.co/qh6SbJa1KS
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
The exhibit is a space that has been transformed for the past two years during the summer into the annual “Dusk to… https://t.co/x4IXS5ogyl
h J R

Sidebar Bottom Block Ad