“Deadpool 2” review: Sometimes more does not mean better

“Deadpool 2” review: Sometimes more does not mean better

“Deadpool 2” review: Sometimes more does not mean better
May 23
00:27 2018

2016’s “Deadpool” was a big turning point for comic book characters in movies. Since the acceptance of one of the industry’s most out-there characters into mainstream pop culture, we’ve seen dozens of B-tier and C-tier heroes and villains on the silver screen in the past two years.

“Deadpool” proved a comic book character can deliver raunchy jokes and gross-out humor just as well as the Avengers can save the world. With such a unique twist so gracefully executed on a character, “Deadpool” legitimized what a comic book movie can be.

“Deadpool 2” captures none of this “lightning in a bottle” feeling we felt for the first time, however, and this movie often lacks momentum because of it. While I can’t say I didn’t laugh, jokes were largely hit or miss and were generally inconsistent in delivery. The action was murky and toned down, and it felt like a “B-side” of Deadpool jokes that didn’t make it into the original. I constantly felt as though I was asking myself why this all felt so familiar.

Ryan Reynolds reprises his iconic role of Wade Wilson/Deadpool as he sets out to find renewed purpose for life after a failed suicide attempt. He spends a bit of time with the X-Men, creates his own team, the socially conscious X-Force, and meets a bevy of characters from obscure X-Men comic runs as he bounces from ridiculous scenario to ridiculous scenario. Josh Brolin’s Cable also goes head to head with the Merc with a Mouth, another long-awaited silver screen pair up.

“Deadpool 2” is a soft R rating. The action in the movie often feels out of focus, leaving you wishing you were watching the slick editing and impressive choreography of the first, and the jokes try too hard to shock the audience. Language is one of Deadpool’s trademarks, and this is probably the only legitimate cause for an R rating. Everything else feels watered down.

Brolin does a fine job as Cable, who is working with a script that’s just not developed enough. That feeling is consistent through every character — even Reynold’s Deadpool. No one is all that relatable, so every supporting character feels like a catalyst for a punchline scribbled out five minutes before shooting. This is a risk when dealing with a movie that relies on ad-lib comedy, and I don’t think Reynolds carries things all that well.

For all the meta-humor and parody that’s present in the movie, it falls victim to a lot of predictable clichés, including a lame ’80s movie style message about family and love.

With everything having been said, it is more “Deadpool.” It is still raunchy, it is still violent and it is still a good time.

“Deadpool 2” feels undercooked. The script, the jokes, the action and the characters are all satisfactory, but they never stand out in any way to make this outing feel unique. Deadpool is a fantastic character, but I can’t help but feel as though the whole “potty mouth bad boy” schtick is running out of steam already.

Reynolds has voiced doubts about a “Deadpool 3” and whether or not it would be viewed as derivative, and I think that’s a very possible risk. I don’t know where to take this character, but I think to keep the character going, another evolution of what the comic book movie can be is necessary.

 My rating: 3/5

 Featured Image: Courtesy Facebook

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Zach Helms

Zach Helms

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