North Texas Daily

Disney’s diversity attempt falls flat

Disney’s diversity attempt falls flat

October 25
00:05 2012

Almost every young girl admires a Disney princess. From Cinderella to Ariel, every girl has a princess they can identify with. However, it was not until recently that Disney introduced princesses from different ethnic backgrounds.

In 2007, Princess Tiana was introduced as the first African-American princess in the Disney franchise with “The Princess and the Frog”. The character created controversy almost immediately, with many complaints about the equal representation of different ethnicities.

I’m happy that Disney introduced an African-American princess, but what about Hispanics? Even people of Middle Eastern heritage were represented by Princess Jasmine in “Aladdin,” but I’ve never heard complaints about Disney’s lack of Hispanic characters.

Disney recently introduced Princess Sofia, the first “Latina princess,” but as a woman with a Hispanic background I still feel unrepresented. It turns out that Sofia is actually a mixed-heritage princess. Her parents are from Spain and Scandinavia, and she is fair-skinned with blue eyes.

Is Disney afraid to fully commit to a Latina princess? It’s a little too late to be afraid of stereotyping, since “The Princess and the Frog” was set in New Orleans during the Jazz Age – and despite being a good movie, had plenty of stereotypical characters.

The other princesses have gotten loads of merchandising hype, with dolls, clothes, shoes, DVDs and playsets, but I doubt I’ll see any Sofia dolls in stores this holiday season.

Even more disappointing is that Sofia’s upcoming movie will only air on TV and later be adapted into a Disney Channel series. So, not only is she not inaccurately portrayed, she won’t even have the chance to appear in theaters.

Disney should have taken a better shot at a Latina princess. I’m not asking for a brand-new fairytale, but they could at least adapt an old classic.

“Cinderella” has seen many adaptations, including a live action version featuring African-American actress Brandy Norwood as Cinderella. It’s easy to cast a Hispanic woman in a movie, or simply animate one into a classic fairytale that has not yet had the chance to become a full-length film – for example, “The Princess and the Pea.”

Princess Sofia should have a chance to be part of a classic. The story of Rapunzel was remade as “Tangled,” and hit theaters before coming out on DVD. Princess Sofia deserves that same chance, rather than being pushed aside into a TV series and never seeing the silver screen.

I applaud Disney for the effort, but until Princess Sofia is at Disney World and in theaters, I won’t be satisfied.

Therese Mendez is a pre-journalism sophomore. She may be reached at t_mendez11@yahoo.com.

About Author

Views-Editor

Views-Editor

0 Comments

No Comments Yet!

There are no comments at the moment, do you want to add one?

Write a comment

Write a Comment

Search Bar

Sidebar Thumbnails Ad

Twitter Feed

North Texas Daily @ntdaily
From the Back to School publication: What to know about each North Texas sport as a new school year approaches 📝 @JohnFields0 🖼️ @ooopsrobynn https://t.co/cxu3aG0a9i
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
DOSE: Four shows to check out this August 📝 @gmtittle 🖼️ @GishhyOrange https://t.co/FccU3EkjgI
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
DOSE: 'Old' shows M. Night Shyamalan’s style is outdated 📝 @OberkromJaden https://t.co/lg1Eenlgcu
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
NEWS: University's Center for Young Children reopens with new curriculum and mission 📝 @yarylira 🖼️ @ooopsrobynn https://t.co/j7r6YoHEHm
h J R
North Texas Daily @ntdaily
Happy Thursday! Check out our eleventh and final issue of the summer online now! Also, find our special publication, Back to School, on newsstands around campus today! https://t.co/s5wKVV6Hxs
h J R

Sidebar Bottom Block Ad

Flytedesk Ad

Instagram