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Regular gym-goers should always respect newcomers

Regular gym-goers should always respect newcomers

Regular gym-goers should always respect newcomers
January 17
12:30 2020

What are the true expectations of attending the gym? Besides the usage of the equipment, are there set rules for how gym-goers are to conduct their affairs? In the stance of morals and ethics, are we to question the actions of gym-goers who exercise at their pace and mind their own business?

It is currently 2020 and many people have created their New Year’s Resolutions with a goal to exercise and get into shape. I support this 100 percent, but what I do not agree with is the blatant rudeness that is inflicted upon newcomers by some regular gym-goers.

At the gym, some newcomers tend to exercise at their own pace and perform their preferred exercise routines. They simply mind their business and enjoy their own endeavors. However, the problem is when they are interrupted as they receive rude and inconsiderate actions by some regular gym-goers, such as stares or weird glances. In addition, the problem lies in the idea that some regular gym-goers scowl at the idea that not everyone wishes to exercise like them.

However, in my opinion, the regular gym-goers who have a rude view of newcomers should mind their own business due to their need for reflection and aspects that involve attending the gym in the beginning stage.

Some regular gym-goers are not reflective and understanding that everyone does not have the same exercise pace nor the ability to function on the same level as them. It takes time for newcomers to become acclimated to their new environment. Also, some seasoned gym-goers do not realize that they were once on the same level as newcomers, so there should to be some level of understanding that everyone starts from the bottom. Plus, no one gains anything from ridiculing newcomers.

One day, a couple of my friends and I attended the Pohl Recreation Center, where some regular gym-goers were constantly watching and snickering under their breaths as we were just exercising. We were simply minding our business but noticed some regular gym-goers throwing nasty glares. This caused my friends and I to resort to exercise in a more secluded area off-campus where we would not have to deal with the ridicule.

We didn’t necessarily have to move to a more secluded area, but it was more comfortable for my friends and I at the time. Eventually, I worked up the courage to continue attending the gym and not care about what anyone thinks since I planned to attend the gym for my personal benefit and conduct my exercise routine at my own pace.

More than 64 percent of women avoid the gym due to the fear of being judged and gawked at, according to a study from theactivetimes.com. This is not only rude and against gym etiquette, but is also a prime reason as to why some people tend to stay away from exercising at the gym. It correlates back to how some regular gym-goers pass judgements without understanding that not everyone is going to conduct the same exercise routine as them.

In a study from ihrsa.com, about 50 percent of the 2,000 participants felt intimated to exercise around others, where 47 percent responded that they were uncomfortable to exercise specifically around fit people. That alone demonstrates the level of anxiety that newcomers experience once they begin to exercise and continue to exercise around regular gym-goers. Some seasoned gym-goers forget the idea that newcomers are already fighting their own concerns and insecurities. To add ridicule to the picture, it diminishes their level of confidence and self-esteem.

This issue arises as some seasoned gym-goers pass judgment against newcomers without understanding their stories as well as not being reflective of how they once reached their own exercise goals.

Newcomers to the gym are not obligated to abide by regular gym-goers’ exercise routines, especially since everyone is different in body shape and in what they can handle. One logical solution to the problem of newcomers feeling out-of-place and judged at the gym, is that new attendees should do whatever makes them happy and not worry about what anyone else has to say, which is arguably easier said than done. However, by ignoring the ones who are rude and pass judgment, newcomers can conduct their business and fulfill their goals.

Newcomers can also find distractions while they’re exercising, such as listening to uplifting music through their headphones. Being in the zone will help newcomers put themselves and their goals as a priority rather than worrying about what others will have to say. Another solution would be to find gender-specific gyms, such as Delta Life Fitness and Curves, and/or hire a personal trainer if attainable. This can allow newcomers to find a space where they can feel more comfortable and accepted.

I am all for going to the gym, but I am not in agreement in the way that some seasoned gym-goers pass judgement and ridicule newcomers. I believe that particular regular gym-goers should take some time to reflect about how they were once nowhere near their goal. They should also understand that every newcomer has different body structures, health statuses and momentum.

For the newcomers or anyone who is afraid to attend the gym, brush off the judgments, walk in with your head held high and go achieve your goals the way you decide.

Featured Illustration: Olivia Varnell

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Makayla Vaults

Makayla Vaults

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