North Texas Daily

The American hypocrisy behind #FirstWorldProbs

The American hypocrisy behind #FirstWorldProbs

September 07
12:48 2016

“Anyone ever have a really good make-up day and then don’t want to take it off at night? #FirstWorldProbs”  – @ellenmcadoo

It’s 2016 and the ever popular #FirstWorldProbs is still one of the biggest trending hashtags on Twitter to date. From people complaining about their soup not being hot enough to having issues with their doughnut being baked with too much icing, it appears that Americans are always searching for new ways to subliminally take shots at other cultures. While that may not be the case most of the time, it certainly seems to be the case whenever people make mountains out of molehills. This is where “first world problems” are born.

#FirstWorldProbs came into fruition a few years ago, quickly catching fire as a trending topic on social media sites before bleeding into pop culture permanently. At first, it was what it was: a meme. But as soon as people turned the meme into an arrogant parade, using the hashtag to explicitly complain about everyday issues grew into normalcy for people. These issues no longer stemmed from the origins of what the phrase meant, but how the intended message became a virtual rabbit hole for people to disregard “third world countries.” Believe it or not, they do experience hardships of their own!

The phrase itself, “first world problems,” refers to the issues in privileged nations that are not necessarily major concerns, but more superficial and minor quandaries that really don’t hold any morsels of importance. Nations like the United States.

It’s okay to have the occasional problem that’s immaterial, and it’s totally fine to complain about it also. Each and every person has an unalienable right to express themselves, and it’s also human nature to have pet peeves in general. Where it becomes hypocritical, almost cynical, is when people find it appropriate to bookend tweets with #FirstWorldProblems as a solemn way to sound genuine grievances.

By using the hashtag as a period to end these troublesome sentences, not only are you stating how you know your problems are insignificant, you are also acknowledging that your problems are exclusively tied to the flaunting of your privileges. Those in countries like Ethiopia couldn’t possibly deal with cell phones going out or stores not having their favorite Pop-Tarts. If those are the case, charge your phone or just buy some Toaster Strudels. It’s not that hard, everyone!

It’s okay to complain about your problems, and it’s reasonable to strive for your lifestyle to be better. We all deal with our personal piddling dilemmas that we feel the need to complain about every now and then. But acknowledging that they’re first world problems, and meaning it, only tells fellow web users that American hypocrisy is alive and real. So remember: when you use that hashtag, you’re implying by default that third world countrymen don’t have problems on similar magnitudes. Because at the end of the day, your situation could still be worse.

About Author

Victoria Baghaei

Victoria Baghaei

I write opinions, yo.

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