North Texas Daily

Theatre major captivates Denton with hair salon

Theatre major captivates Denton with hair salon

November 25
12:27 2015

Matt Payne | Senior Staff Writer

@MattePaper

Taking a full academic load of 18 hours, managing a salon three days a week past 2 a.m. and aspiring to start his own daytime talk show modeled after “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” theater and broadcast senior Enrique Granado is a man of many trades.

Since third grade, when he began shadowing his grandfather in the salon he worked in, Granado has been immersed in hairstyling.

“I’ve been accustomed to being surrounded by hard work my entire life,” Granado said. “And if I’m not at work or school, I’m enjoying some one hour of free time watching TV. I often do homework on the train I take to Denton.”

Granado credits the motivation to pursue his interests and long-term aspirations to his family. He comes from a lineage of hairstyling, though his father works in law enforcement.

Owner Enrique Granado and hair stylist Subrina Bailey proactively connect with both clientele and community. Matt Payne | Senior Staff Writer

Owner Enrique Granado and hair stylist Subrina Bailey proactively connect with both clientele and community. Matt Payne | Senior Staff Writer

Approaching its one-year anniversary, Captivative Salon was established with unorthodox business ideals in mind. Prior to starting the business, Granado was employed as a hairstylist at several North Texas TONI&GUY locations.

Because of the rigorous corporate training including coursework, exams and an all-around intense standard established by TONI&GUY, Granado said he was burnt out on the trade he grew up learning by the spring of 2013.

“The policies a big corporation like TONI&GUY had were so rigid,” Granado said. “If you failed any of the training exams, you had to start over, and it became very frustrating, I learned a lot with TONI&GUY, but I just didn’t have the creative freedom that I do now.”

Because of an overwhelming demand from frequent clientele he established during his time with TONI&GUY, Granado began taking business management courses at UNT to learn the skills necessary for entrepreneurship.

In January of 2014, he rented a space in Addison and spent hours, long past midnight, assembling furniture purchased on his own.

With the aid of fellow hairstylists from neighboring suites, Granado’s Captivative Salon began to establish a proactive role in the Addison community, complete with a dependable clientele.

Dallas resident Brad Freese was a regular at TONI&GUY and now makes an hour-long commute for appointments with Granado.

“Enrique has such an eye for detail and is very personable,” Freese said. “I could easily go somewhere closer, but the experience with Enrique makes up for anything else.”

Granado believes engagement with customers is a key factor in building his business, and the salon has attended volunteer events in Addison. The entrepreneur has even provided free haircuts for the homeless.

“My academic and professional career both prepare me for the same purpose,” Granado said. “Being constantly filmed, acting and being friendly with customers have all helped me become comfortable with being around people and is good preparation for both my goals in television and in hairstyling.”

Across the hall in a neighboring salon, hair stylist Subrina Bailey joined Granado in his efforts to build a place with a self-proclaimed focus on compassion, commitment and contentment, which happens to be the salon’s motto..

“[Enrique] is more of a by-the-book guy, and I’m the more creative type,” Bailey, a 20-year salon arts veteran, said. “I think we compliment each other well. We’re often called the best-kept secret in all of Addison.”

The two share a focus on more intimate customer engagement, from an appointment-exclusive business model down to a dress code of exclusively pink attire.

“I’m naturally a very complimentary person and I feel it’s important to maintain a friendly atmosphere,” Bailey said. “The business aspects of this job can be stressful, but not the consultation. That’s an opportunity to cater to their needs and build long relationships.”

Featured Image: Brad Freese commutes over an hour specifically for appointments with colorist Enrique Granado. Matt Payne | Senior Staff Photographer

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