North Texas Daily

Why Netflix is better

Why Netflix is better

Ari Solorio

Why Netflix is better
January 25
18:03 2018

I’ll admit it, I’m a Netflix binger.

It can’t be helped. When a service delivers a product so good, so fresh and so accessible, I need it.

As a busy student, my schedule is often packed and on top of that, it can change drastically one hour to the next.

In ancient times before Netflix or other streaming services, if you didn’t plan your life around the time your favorite show aired on TV (for some of us, yes, it can be that serious), you missed it and were left behind.

With Netflix, the viewer actively and directly chooses what they want to watch. Unlike regular TV, where the viewer often has to wait until something they like is on, which can be frustrating and boring.

Netflix has become increasingly popular within the last few years, many people going as far as completely opting out of cable and embracing the streaming life.

For college students especially, the appeals of Netflix are many, and all for the simple price of $9.99 a month.

The most pressing for me, is the ability to fly through a show at high speed — there’s no waiting for a new episode every week.

The storyline doesn’t stale by having to wait, with its constant occurrences and distractions, to see what happens next.

A whole dramatic arc in episodic form, all absorbed over the course, for me, of a long weekend.

Another large and very enabling component of this is at the end of an episode — say, “Gilmore Girls” — and Netflix only takes about 10 seconds before the next episode automatically starts playing.

The viewer doesn’t have to press anything.

Evaluating how Netflix’s ownership and production policy has changed the ethics and social responsibility of entertainment also boasts its own surprises.

Many of the shows Netflix has spearheaded are innovative because of the spotlight they’ve placed on communities that often have a hard time being represented in regular TV  shows.  Netflix’s “Luke Cage,” “Orange is the New Black” and “The Get Down” are some of the best examples of shows that boasts a majority-minority cast.

Shonda Rhimes, prolific screenwriter and creator of “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Scandal” and “How to Get Away With Murder,” expressed this is the reason why she is leaving TV and has signed an exclusive multi-year development deal with Netflix.

Since its introduction of “House of Cards” in 2013, Netflix has also set the stage for original content. “13 Reasons Why,” “Stranger Things” and “Black Mirror” have all been hits. Netflix’s shows have dominated awards ceremonies, indicating they’ve had large impact in the viewership sphere.

I’ll acknowledge, though, that Netflix is not perfect. Their collection of movies and shows could be bigger and more varied.

As if in response to these concerns, Netflix has recently stepped up their game in the foreign entertainment section, streaming more Korean dramas and even going as far as to produce its own German original series, “Dark.”

It would be fair to evaluate what it is we are actually losing with the decline in cable, but to be honest, it doesn’t seem like much.

Featured Image: Illustration by Ari Solorio

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Maritza Ramos

Maritza Ramos

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